Rhosymedre (“Rosie”) Corgi Barnum-Robson died of natural causes at her home in Washington, DC, on Wednesday, April 20, 2011, after a long battle with canine degenerative myelopathy (DM), which left her unable to walk for the last year of her life. She had been in decline in recent weeks, but after a month in her Cleveland home with her human companion Tim Robson, she had returned to Washington, with her other human companion, George Barnum on Sunday, April 17. She crossed the Rainbow Bridge peacefully in her sleep while George was at work. She was thirteen years old and was born near Boise, Idaho. She came to live with George and Tim (flying as carry-on luggage) when she was nine months old.

Rosie was well known for her winning personality and friendly smile to one and all. She was rarely in a bad mood, and until she became unable to do so, she never walked anywhere when she could run. Some of her favorite things were chasing her kong toy, scratches behind the ears, sniffing things on a walk, tummy rubs, toast, milk bone biscuits, rides in the car and most of all being close to her people. She was especially pleased in her retirement when Tim let her sleep up on the bed with him. She had never agreed with the philosophy that dogs should sleep on the floor.

Rosie was very well traveled, commuting regularly for her whole life between her Cleveland and Washington homes.

She was very fond of going to “corgi camp” in Parma with her friends Karen and Tom Oye, when Tim and George both needed to be out of town at the same time. She was always disappointed to come home again and discover that her regular caregivers didn’t lavish the same kind of undivided attention that she felt she deserved at all times.

After the DM caused Rosie to be unable to walk unassisted, for over a year she used a set of custom-made “wheels” that enabled her to get around at top speed and to continue her chase-the-kong games. Despite her almost total incapacitation during the last year of her life, she continued to have her smiling and inquisitive disposition.

One of her last public appearances was at the Kelvin Smith Library staff picnic in the summer of 2010, when she rolled around ensconced on her fuzzy red plush blanket in her red wagon. She was still able to put the other more mobile dog guests in their place, with a fierce woof and a display of her remaining teeth.

Besides her human companions, Rosie is survived by Mitsou the Himalayan cat, with whom Rosie had a lifelong uneasy truce. Except for Mitsou, who doesn’t really care, she will be missed by a host of friends.

Rest in peace, Rosie.

Here is a small Rosie movie to download.